Apr 20, 2024  
Butler University Bulletin 2023-2024 
  
Butler University Bulletin 2023-2024

Academic Programs



Butler University’s challenging learning environment includes a wide range of academic programs steeped in the liberal arts, which provide excellent career and graduate school preparation. Butler offers more than 60 major academic fields of study in our academic divisions: College of Liberal Arts and Science, Lacy School of Business, College of Communication, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, College of Education, Division of Professional Studies, and Jordan College of the Arts. Graduate programs are available within in each. Continued partnerships include the Engineering Dual Degree Program with Purdue University at Indianapolis, enabling students to obtain two degrees in five years–a bachelor of science degree from Butler and a bachelor of science in engineering from Purdue University. Butler also offers pre-professional programs in dentistry, law, medicine, physical therapy, seminary, and veterinary medicine. Butler is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The University is licensed for teacher training by the Indiana Office of Educator Licensing and Development. University colleges and departments are accredited by their respective professional associations.

Program Offerings

Butler University’s six colleges and the Division of Professional Studies offer the following undergraduate and graduate degrees: 

Undergraduate students may choose to add a minor to their study. Minors are posted to the student’s transcript along with the major and degree earned.

The Core Curriculum

Go to information for The Core Curriculum.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Go to information for College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Major

Combined Major

Graduate Program

Minor

Undergraduate Non-Degree Programs

Other Programs

College of Education

Go to information for College of Education.

Major

Graduate Program

Minor

Graduate Certificate Programs

Graduate Pathway Programs

Lacy School of Business

Go to information for Lacy School of Business.

Major

Graduate Program

Minor

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Go to information for College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

Major

Graduate Program

Graduate Non-Degree Programs: Certificate

Minor

Graduate Certificate Programs

Jordan College of the Arts

Go to information for Jordan College of the Arts.

Major

Graduate Program

Minor

Undergraduate Non-Degree Programs

College of Communication

Go to information for College of Communication.

Major

Graduate Program

Graduate Non-Degree Programs: Certificate

Minor

Division of Professional Studies

Go to information for Division of Professional Studies.

Graduate Program

 

Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-Health Professions

(Pre-dentistry, Pre-medicine, Pre-occupational therapy, Pre-optometry, Pre-physical therapy, Pre-physician’s assistant, Pre-podiatry, Pre-veterinary medicine)

Pre-health students may choose any major, but most students elect to major in the biological sciences, chemistry, or biochemistry. For admission, most professional schools require one year of biology, one year each of general and organic chemistry, one year of physics, and one semester each of biochemistry, statistics, and psychology; however, there are numerous additional requirements based on pre-health profession, and the expectations of professional schools vary. Students should consult with their pre-health advisor concerning the requirements of the particular professional schools in which they are interested. Pre-health coursework varies according to the student’s goal, but every student has the choice of completing a number of elective courses. These are offered both to enhance pre-professional training and to broaden and deepen the student’s education. Students also may participate in research programs, shadowing experiences, and campus and community service opportunities. Many pre-health students also find employment in a healthcare setting. A science major (biology, chemistry, etc.) in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires a minimum of 30 hours of coursework in that department as well as foreign language requirements. Regardless of the major area of study, courses in biology, chemistry, and physics are required to adequately prepare students for success in their professional field. Two pre-health faculty advisors host numerous presentations and workshops, schedule networking events throughout the year, mentor the pre-health clubs on campus, and work one-on-one with students to tailor an academic program to meet individual needs and career goals. Students’ individualized academic schedules will allow them to meet all professional school entrance requirements and prepare them for the nationally administered entrance examinations for health professional schools. Students interested in pre-health advising should contact the Engaged Learning Center early in their academic careers.

Pre-Law

Butler pre-law students may choose any major. The Law School Admission Council advises that “Law schools want students who can think critically and write well, and who have some understanding of the forces that have shaped the human experience. These attributes can be acquired in any number of college courses, whether in the arts and humanities, the social sciences, or the natural sciences.” In addition, courses introducing legal principles may be helpful to students in assessing whether to continue to pursue law. Finally, courses in logic, mathematics, and analytical reasoning may enhance preparation for the Law School Admission Test. Students also may participate in the Butler Pre-Law Society, other networking events, and internship opportunities in Indianapolis or during the Washington, DC or New York City Learning Semester. Students interested in pre-law advising should contact the Engaged Learning Center and the University’s Pre-Law Advisor (Professor Lewinski mlewinski@butler.edu) early in their academic careers.

Graduation Honors

Butler University students may graduate with University honors, departmental distinction, or both. To be eligible to graduate with either, a student must be an undergraduate who has completed at least 60 academic hours for a grade at Butler University.

University Honors

Cum laude–a Butler cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.70 or higher, or both a Butler cumulative GPA of 3.50 and completion of the University Honors Program

Magna cum laude–a Butler cumulative GPA of 3.70 or higher and completion of the University Honors Program

Summa cum laude–a Butler cumulative GPA of 3.90 or higher and completion of the University Honors Program

Departmental Distinction

The purpose of departmental distinction is to recognize students for exceptional achievement within their major. Students are nominated for departmental distinction by the head of the department of their academic major. Three levels of departmental distinction are awarded:

  • “In (major) with Distinction” is awarded to a nominee who has a GPA of at least 3.6 in the academic major
  • “In (major) with High Distinction” is awarded to a nominee who has a GPA of at least 3.7 in the academic major. Additionally, pursuant to individual departmental guidelines, the nominee must either pass a comprehensive exam in the major subject or complete a thesis with a topic approved by the appropriate College Honors Board. If the department does not have a comprehensive exam, then the thesis is a requirement for High Distinction. “In (major) with Highest Distinction” is awarded to a nominee who has a GPA of at least 3.8 in the academic major. Additionally, pursuant to individual departmental guidelines, the nominee must either pass a comprehensive examination in the major, complete a thesis with a topic approved by the appropriate College Honors Board, or both, as the department mandates.
  • Students should consult their academic advisor for the specific departmental distinction requirements of their major.

All comprehensive exams must comply with five minimum standards. They must:

  1. Be developed and administered by the departments or programs (i.e., GRE and other external standardized tests are not appropriate)
  2. Be relevant to the student’s coursework in the department
  3. Include a written component
  4. Include a component that is common to all students and that tests their understanding of core knowledge in the discipline
  5. Include questions that require synthesis of ideas and comprehensive reflection about a substantial portion of the student’s departmental coursework

University Honors Program

The Butler University Honors Program exists to meet the expectations of academically outstanding students in all colleges and majors who wish to develop their talents and potential to the fullest. It is designed–through a combination of honors courses, cultural events, independent study, and creative activity–to foster a diverse and challenging intellectual environment for honors students and to enhance the academic community by adding a distinctive note of innovative thinking and interdisciplinary dialogue. Students who have been accepted to Butler University with an application date prior to November 1 will be invited to apply to the University Honors Program if they meet any of the following criteria: a high school GPA of 3.95 (on a 4.0 scale), a 1,360 or higher combined SAT score, 30 or higher composite ACT score, or they are in the top 5 percent of their graduating high school class (with a minimum class size of 100). Admission decisions to the program for incoming students will also be based on an application essay. Students with at least 16 graded credits at Butler University and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.60 also are invited to petition to enter the program by writing a letter detailing their interest as well as securing a letter of recommendation from a Butler professor.

The University Honors Program requires satisfactory completion of the following:

  • Honors Courses–Four honors courses are required, including at least one HN 200  and at least one HN 300 , in addition to either HN 397  or HN 398 . A student must earn a minimum grade of B for an honors course to count toward completion of University Honors Program requirements. Honors First-Year Seminar (HN 110  and HN 111 ) is taken in the first year. Students who do not take HN 110  and HN 111  in their first year must replace this experience with an additional HN 200  or HN 300  course.
  • Departmental Honors Course–If a department requires a departmental honors course for thesis preparation, students must take this designated course within their department or college for credit. The designated departmental honors course does not count toward the four required honors courses. Students should consult their academic advisor to see what their individual department requires for thesis preparation.
  • Honors Thesis Proposal Course–This course is typically taken during spring semester of the penultimate academic year. The product of the course (HN397 for 1 credit or HN398 for 2 credits) will be a thesis proposal, which will be submitted for review on the Friday before Spring Break.
  • Honors Thesis–All University Honors Program students are required to complete an honors thesis. The thesis is a major research or creative project, usually (but not necessarily) in the field of the student’s major and advised by a full-time faculty member. The project begins following the approval of the thesis proposal, and the completed thesis is due during the semester the student intends to graduate. Each student must also deliver an oral presentation of her or his thesis before an audience at an appropriate forum.

Other Requirements

Honors Community Events: Students are required to attend eight honors community events during their first three years. These community events will be announced to all honors students and may include honors course speakers, honors course presentations, presentations/performances of undergraduate thesis work, community events sponsored by the Student Honors Council, and/or special events sponsored by the University Honors Program.

Sophomore Review: All students will be reviewed in the second semester of their second year (i.e., in the fourth semester at Butler). To remain active in the program, students must demonstrate satisfactory progress by having completed a minimum of 64 credit hours at Butler with a GPA of at least 3.4, and completed at least one honors course with a demonstrated timeline for completing the remaining courses by the expected graduation date.

All students have the right of petition to waive or substitute certain criteria.

www.butler.edu/academics/honors/

Honors Courses

International Education

Butler University encourages students to study in international settings as part of their academic experience. Students may choose to study for a semester, academic year, or on short-term programs (summer, fall short-term, winter break, spring break, and spring short-term). All students who wish to study abroad must apply through the Center for Global Education (CGE) and are expected to select their program from the Center’s List of Approved Programs for Overseas Study (www.butler.edu/academics/study-abroad/destinations/). Students may study abroad during their sophomore and junior years, and possibly their senior year, if their academic Dean approves their petition to intrude upon their final 30 hours at Butler.

Center for Global Education (CGE)

The Center for Global Education provides leadership, coordination, and administrative support for the comprehensive internationalization of the University. The CGE manages all study abroad activity, provides advising, organizes pre-departure and re-entry sessions, and maintains Butler’s List of Approved Programs for Overseas Study. These programs offer a wide variety of options to Butler students interested in studying abroad during the academic year. All programs on the list meet Butler’s high standards for academic excellence. Students are expected to select their overseas study program from the List of Approved Programs for semester- and academic year-long programs. The programs fall into two broad categories: reciprocal exchanges and study abroad programs. The CGE also offers its own faculty-led programs. For more information, contact the CGE in Jordan Hall, or visit www.butler.edu/academics/study-abroad.

Butler Semester in Spain Program

Butler offers a faculty-led program at the University of Alcalá de Henares each fall term. Butler students are able to take an entire semester’s load of 12 credits that can be applied toward the Spanish major and minor, or can count as electives. All participating students take one course with the Butler faculty director, while the rest of the courses are taught by professors at the University of Alcalá de Henares in courses designed for nonnative speakers of Spanish. Students with superior Spanish language skills can petition to enroll in university courses for native Spanish speakers. The program includes guided excursions to other regions of Spain. All students live with carefully selected Spanish families, thus enriching their opportunities for cultural immersion. Students must have completed two 300-level Spanish courses to be eligible for the program.

Faculty-Led Short-Term Programs

Short-term study abroad programs are not limited to summer anymore! Butler University offers various summer, fall short-term, winter break, spring break, and spring short-term programs, where students can take a class while traveling abroad with a faculty member and a group of Butler students. All the colleges at Butler organize these short-term courses in overseas locations. Students consistently report that these experiences offer a valuable opportunity to learn about the course content while visiting the actual locations they are studying.

International Exchange Programs

Reciprocal exchanges provide opportunities for Butler students to attend carefully selected partner universities abroad while students from those universities attend Butler, on a one-for-one basis. Butler has developed some of these exchange opportunities; others are available through the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). The University’s faculty and study abroad advisor will work closely with individual students to select the program that best fits each student’s academic and personal development needs. Butler has established reciprocal student exchange relationships with premier universities in other countries, including Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Ecuador, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Wales.

A wide range of courses is available at the partner universities in areas such as business, education, languages and cultural studies, and many other disciplines in the arts and sciences. Students also have access to the comprehensive services available to all students attending the university, as well as the continued support provided by the Center for Global Education.

Butler is a member of the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP), headquartered in Washington, DC. ISEP is a worldwide network for international education, consisting of 300+ institutions from more than 50 countries, through which students may exchange on a one-for-one reciprocal basis. Each student Butler sends to an ISEP member institution receives tuition, room and board, and other benefits as defined by the hosting institution. Because ISEP is a totally integrated program, some programs may require an advanced knowledge of the local language to participate; students studying at an institution where the language of instruction is not English must prove sufficient language proficiency to participate.

Study Abroad Programs

A very wide range of program types and geographic destinations is available through the one-directional study abroad programs on the List of Approved Programs. Butler University has been fortunate to have a cooperative agreement with the Institute for Study Abroad (IFSA), founded on Butler’s campus in 1988. The organization annually sends about 3,000 students from 400 U.S. universities to more than 90 universities in Argentina, Australia, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Czech Republic, England, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Scotland, Spain, Sri Lanka, and Wales. IFSA is a separate service organization that helps students through the application process, assists with travel plans, arranges overseas housing, and advises on a variety of related issues. In addition to its Indianapolis office, IFSA maintains fully staffed offices in each country where it has programs. The overseas offices conduct student orientations, sponsor excursions, and provide various student services. All grades earned through an IFSA program are posted to an official Butler University transcript.

Students also may select their overseas study opportunity from programs offered by 11 other colleges, universities, and well-respected study abroad organizations. All provide a wide range of student services and give careful attention to safety and security issues. Approved programs represent a spectrum of geographic regions and areas of study. Educational opportunities may be classroom-based or experiential, including internships, service learning, research, and student teaching.

Tuition and Financial Aid Applicability for Study Abroad

In most cases, federal and state aid will apply to study abroad costs if the student is currently receiving aid. Students who study abroad will pay Butler University tuition during their semester(s) abroad. Those who participate in the Butler Semester in Spain Program, as well as in reciprocal exchange programs–through Butler’s bilateral exchanges or ISEP–may apply 100 percent of their Butler institutional financial aid to their tuition for their semester(s) abroad. Those who participate in other approved study abroad programs may apply 50 percent of their Butler institutional financial aid toward their tuition for their first study abroad semester, and 25 percent for their second semester abroad.

Domestic Off-Campus Programs

Washington, DC Learning Semester

Through the Center for Global Education, Butler University runs a semester-long program in Washington, DC, which features internships for Butler students from a wide variety of colleges and disciplines. The Center for Global Education helps students identify internship opportunities tailored to each student’s career interests and academic needs. Recent Butler student internships have been undertaken at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Israeli Embassy, Amnesty International, the White House, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, numerous offices in the Senate and House (including the Speaker of the House), and the Food and Drug Administration. During this semester, students also take courses specially designed to enhance their DC experience, such as The Arts of Public Washington and Our Nation’s Capital: How the Locals See It. Students register and pay tuition through Butler, typically receive their regular financial aid and scholarships, and earn credits in their degree programs. Juniors and seniors of all majors can apply to participate in the fall or spring semester.

An updated list of coursework offered in Washington, DC can be found on the program brochure page: https://global-education.butler.edu/?go=InternDC.

New York City Learning Semester

Through the Center for Global Education, Butler University runs a semester-long program in New York City, which features internships for Butler students from a wide variety of colleges and disciplines. The Center for Global Education helps students identify internship opportunities tailored to each student’s career interests and academic needs. During this semester, students also take courses specifically designed to enhance their NYC experience. Students register and pay tuition through Butler, typically receive their regular financial aid and scholarships, and earn credits in their degree programs. Juniors and seniors of all majors can apply to participate in fall semesters.

An updated list of coursework offered in New York City can be found on the program brochure page: https://global-education.butler.edu/?go=InternNYC.

ROTC Programs

Butler students may enroll in Air Force and Army ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) programs. Army ROTC courses (100 and 200 level) are taught on the Butler campus. Through classes and field training, Army ROTC provides the tools to become an Army officer without interfering with other classes. ROTC also provides students with discipline and money for tuition while enhancing the college experience. Students interested in enrolling in Army ROTC can start by taking an Army ROTC basic elective course that is open to all students. Talk to the Butler Military Science instructor about other ways to join Army ROTC and incentives available, including opportunities to compete for two-, three-, or four-year scholarships. More information: 317-274-0073, fax 317-274-0069, jlbarker@butler.edu, www.butler.edu/rotc.

Air Force ROTC (AFROTC) courses are offered at the Indiana University campus, Bloomington. All Air Force ROTC courses (100-400 level) include a separate leadership laboratory, which meets once each week. This laboratory augments the AFROTC academic curriculum by providing prospective Air Force officers the opportunities and feedback needed to develop the leadership, followership, managerial, and supervisory skills required of successful Air Force officers. More information: 800-IUB-ROTC, afrotc@indiana.edu.

Air Force ROTC Courses

Army ROTC Courses